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Bifocal

Bifocal Contacts

Bifocal contact lenses are a type of contact lens that combine two different prescriptions in the same lens. One component corrects nearsightedness and the other prescription addresses farsightedness or farsightedness. Several types of bifocal contacts are available; your eye care provider can help you determine which option is best for you.

What Types of Bifocal Contacts Are Available?

  • The reading power is in the center of the lens, and the distance (far vision) is on the outside. Or, the distance could be in the middle with the reading on the outside.
  • The distance is on the top, and the reading power is on the bottom, similar to bifocal eyeglasses. These contact lenses are weighted at the bottom to keep the reading power on the bottom.
  • The reading and distance powers blend from the outside towards the center.

What Kind of Bifocal Contacts Should I Wear?

At your optometry clinic, you'll be able to explore your options fully. Generally, several factors influence the type of bifocal contacts that are right for you, including:

  • Your age
  • Your eyeglass prescription
  • The type of work you do
  • How you use your eyes, such as looking straight ahead or looking down when you read
  • Typical lighting conditions when you read
  • Your eye shape
  • Your pupil size

What Should I Expect During the Adjustment Period?

Some people adjust quickly while others need some time. You might notice that images jump when you switch between close-up and distance vision, or you might see a ghost image when you read. You might see a halo around lights, or your vision might change when the lens moves on your eyeball. If you experience any of these quirks, talk with your eye care provider. Sometimes, these effects are part of adapting to your new corrective lenses and will go away with time. However, in some cases, you might need to try a different type of lens.

If you're having trouble seeing clearly both up-close and at far distances then bifocal contact lenses offer a convenient alternative to bifocal eyeglasses. It may take longer to adjust to bifocal contacts than to glasses, but many find that it's a worthwhile investment.

earing glasses for several years, switching to contacts can be an easy, painless choice. Understanding the basics about contact lenses allows you to consult with your eye care provider and make the choice that is best for your lifestyle.

Can I wear contact lenses?

Most people are able to wear contact lenses safely and comfortably. There are contact lenses that correct for nearsightedness, farsightedness, astigmatism, and other vision problems. An optometry exam can determine what lenses are appropriate for you.

Are contact lenses safe for my eyes?

Millions of people wear contact lenses without any difficulties. Following recommendations for inserting, removing, cleaning, storing, and replacing contacts typically keeps your eyes safe and healthy. However, you should talk to your eye doctor if you have specific concerns about contact lens safety.

What is the difference between hard and soft contact lenses?

Soft contact lenses are made of plastic combined with water. Soft lenses allow oxygen to pass through the material to your cornea, nourishing and soothing the surface of your eye. Rigid gas permeable contact lenses, sometimes called “hard lenses” are made from a stiffer, oxygen-permeable material. They are often used by individuals with astigmatism or higher-order aberrations.

How often should I change my contact lenses?

The frequency with which you should dispose of lenses depends on the contact lens type. Some lenses are made to be disposed of each night, while others may last several weeks. Talk to your eye doctor and read the instructions on your contact lens package to determine the replacement schedule for your lenses.

Is it possible to lose a contact behind my eye?

No. If you rub your eyes or swim underwater with contacts, it is possible to dislodge your contacts. Usually, they can be found under your upper eyelid and removed without difficulty.

How long does it take to adjust to wearing contacts?

If you’re not used to wearing contacts, you may notice them or feel slight discomfort for a day or two. As you become accustomed to the contact lenses, you will no longer even notice that they’re there.

There are a lot of variables to consider when choosing contact lenses. Think about your typical routine and consult with your eye care provider to find the perfect contact lenses for your lifestyle.